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Medical bombshell: Lead exposure kills 412,000 Americans a year… here’s how exposure happens


A bombshell study published in The Lancet medical journal finds that low-level lead exposure is responsible for the deaths of 412,000 Americans each year, primarily from lead-induced heart disease and ischaemic heart disease.

The study is entitled, “Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults: a population-based cohort study.” (The Lancet Public Health, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, PE177-E184, APRIL 01, 2018).

The alarming number of deaths from lead exposure as calculated by the study exceeds many estimates for the number of Americans killed each year by cancer. If this study is accurate, in other words, lead exposure is killing more Americans than cancer.

Lead is exhaustively documented to cause mental retardation, neurological disorders, skeletal diseases, reproductive toxicity (i.e. birth defects) and numerous other serious health problems.

Via the findings of the study:

The population attributable fraction of the concentration of lead in blood for all-cause mortality was 18.0% (95% CI 10.9–26.1), which is equivalent to 412,000 deaths annually. Respective fractions were 28.7% (15.5–39.5) for cardiovascular disease mortality and 37.4% (23.4–48.6) for ischaemic heart disease mortality, which correspond to 256,000 deaths a year from cardiovascular disease and 185,000 deaths a year from ischaemic heart disease.

The study also warns:

Low-level environmental lead exposure is an important, but largely overlooked, risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality in the USA. A comprehensive strategy to prevent deaths from cardiovascular disease should include efforts to reduce lead exposure.

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Where is all this lead coming from?

At my laboratory (CWC Labs), we’ve used mass spectrometry instrumentation to study lead exposure for the last six years. Our research has so far resulted in two patents, including a patent for “Heavy Metals Defense,” an invention that removes dietary lead from the human digestive tract. (See patent details here.)

Over these last six years, we’ve tested hundreds of U.S. water samples and thousands of foods, supplements and environmental samples. We’ve also tested thousands of hair samples provided by customers who purchase our heavy metals testing kits because they want to know how much lead, mercury, arsenic or cadmium is found in their hair.

Here’s what we’ve found are the primary vectors for lead exposure:

#1) Contaminated dietary supplements

Just recently, Natural News exposed the truth about a probiotics dietary supplement that’s made from a type of coal which contains 10 ppm lead. As an ISO-accredited laboratory, CWC Labs is required to file reports with federal authorities when we encounter potentially hazardous levels of heavy metals in consumer products. Our report was sent to the FTC, reviewed and accepted, then added to the FTC’s law enforcement database that’s searchable by all criminal investigators.

The company threatened legal action against Natural News to try to force the removal of published information describing the high levels of lead found in their product, known as “Prescript-Assist.”

We rarely see lead in supplements at such high levels, but it does exist in the supplements industry. We appear to the be the only independent publisher in the world — other than Consumer Reports — that’s willing to tell the truth about lead in supplements.

#2) Contaminated foods and superfoods

Vegetables that are grown in the ground — such as maca root, turmeric root, ginger, etc. — are frequently contaminated with lead due to the global lead pollution of agricultural soils. Both cacao and coffee are routinely found to contain alarming levels of cadmium, another toxic heavy metal. High levels of arsenic (and sometimes mercury) are routinely found in ocean-derived products, including seaweed and some fish oils that aren’t from clean sources.

Over the years, we’ve also found high levels of lead and other metals in rice protein from China, which is grown in heavily polluted irrigation water that’s contaminated with industrial runoff from China’s factories.

Heavy metals testing is an absolute must for any honest food or dietary supplement manufacturer, yet few companies bother to test for heavy metals because it adds costs to their production.

By the way, the pesticide lead arsenate was used globally for over a century, since it kills bugs very effectively. It’s no longer legal in America but is frequently used elsewhere around the world, including on food crops that are exported to the USA. Lead arsenate, as you might have guessed, is made from two toxic heavy metals: Lead and arsenic. Soils across America are still contaminated with lead from lead arsenate, since lead never disappears. It’s an element, so it doesn’t “break down” and vanish over time like chemical pesticides (eventually) do. Glyphosate, for example, is broken down by soil microbes over time, creating AMPA and other byproducts which, themselves, are further broken down into ammonia and other common molecules.

#3) Environmental pollution

Thanks to the complete lack of environmental enforcement in industrial countries like China, lead pollution is spread around the world via air currents. China’s pollution becomes America’s soils contamination, and China does nothing to reduce emissions of toxic heavy metals and other substances. China is a cesspool of filth, corruption and pollution, and the food and supplement products manufactured in China are very often heavily contaminated as a result. (Yet somehow, all the “environmentalists” in America never demand China take any action whatsoever to reduce its own pollution.)

Lead is still added to aviation fuel, by the way. It’s not added to jet fuel, but rather the aviation fuel that powers small prop aircraft typically used in the general aviation industry. Every time a small plane flies across the sky, it is quite literally dropping lead out of the sky. This is all 100% legal and even endorsed by the FAA because it makes engines run better, with fewer problems, reducing aircraft fatalities. (Combustion engines actually like lead, which is why lead was added to gasoline for decades, all across the country.)

The No. 1 source of lead pollution in the modern environment is lead batteries from automobiles. Make sure you recycle them and help get the lead reclaimed.

#4) Municipal water

As the world recently saw with the lead pollution problem in Detroit, municipal water systems can introduce alarming levels of lead into public water. When water sources are changed, the resulting pH changes can strip lead from the city’s supply pipes, delivering huge quantities of brain-damaging lead to the population.

Notably, in the case of Detroit’s lead pollution scandal, both the EPA and the State of Michigan’s water quality scientists were caught colluding with the scheme to poison the people of Detroit with lead. Thus, when it comes to lead, you can’t even trust the water quality enforcers, because they’re all corrupt, too.

#5) Aluminum foil is contaminated with lead

This is a new one we’ve just discovered in the lab. We haven’t even released the video on this yet, but we’ve found that some brands of aluminum foil are contaminated with lead. And it’s far worse with recycled aluminum foil, which isn’t as pure as non-recycled.

Watch for a bombshell video on this in the next couple of weeks. We’ve done the ICP-MS lab tests and have found some shocking things about aluminum foil that should raise alarm bells, especially if you cook food in it.

#6) Bullets, reloading and firearms

For those of you who engage in reloading of firearms cartridges or training with firearms, you are probably already aware that lead is a common element used in bullets. Firing cartridges that contain lead bullets causes the vaporization of a small amount of lead as the bullet speeds down the rifled barrel. This is why practicing firearms in indoor gun ranges will absolutely expose you to lead in the air. For this reason, it’s better to practice firearms outdoors. Get a suppressor so you don’t annoy the neighbors.

If you are a reloader, be sure to wear latex gloves when handling lead bullets. Most importantly, don’t handle bullets and then handle your food. That’s a sure way to give yourself extremely high exposure to lead. Where possible, purchase bullets that are coated with copper, zinc or other metals so that the lead core isn’t something you directly touch by handling the bullets. In the 22LR caliber, for example, always choose copper-coated bullets instead of plain lead.

Naturally, if you are a game hunter who eats your game, don’t use lead bullets or you will be eating your own lead. And frankly, even if you’re shooting wild hogs, don’t use lead bullets either because the predator birds will end up eating that lead, then dropping it right back onto your land through their excrement.

Lead sticks to soil quite well, by the way, so if you shoot with lead bullets, make sure the lead stays trapped in a large dirt berm. In a collapse scenario, you could always harvest the lead from the berm and use it to cast new bullets.

No one has tested more food products for lead than CWC labs

At CWC Labs, we’ve tested many thousands of products for lead and other heavy metals. Recently, we’ve begun publishing videos about all this at FoodForensics.com.

Here’s a new podcast that explains heavy metals contamination vectors and why this matters so much to your health. As always, it’s available exclusively on Brighteon.com, since YouTube bans any real science information in order to protect the poison-pushing corporations.

https://www.brighteon.com/f007c13b-87bf-4a68-96c0-c726a411a920

Read more about heavy metals at HeavyMetals.news.



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